Poolbeg marina, Dublin to Arklow 39.5 nm Sailing around Britain 2014

Date posted: 14 August 2014
Kantara in Poolbeg marina Dublin

Kantara in Poolbeg marina Dublin

Our visit to Dublin coincided with the arrival of hurricane Bertha, thankfully we placed ourselves facing west on the pontoon, meaning the wind was on our bow and we didn’t rock. The winds were high, gale force 8, so we were careful mooring up, adding additional lines and fenders, but if I was honest we didn’t notice the extreme weather.
Poolbeg marina charged us an initial 61.20 Euros for three nights and then 30 Euros 60cents for every proceeding night. The showers were 2 Euros and to use the laundry cost an additional 5 Euros to wash and 5 Euros to dry.
We lost Marian and Simon on day one, they tramped off to stay at Marians sisters house, the lure and ease of living in a house was too much for them. But we were invited for a roast dinner, a rare treat in deed for us, which we thoroughly enjoyed, and only a twenty minute walk from the marina.

Sean and I booked ourselves on the Dublin sightseeing bus tour, which gave us unlimited travel for two days on the tour. We stayed on the bus for the whole two hand a half hours on day one, just to get an overview, of where we thought we would like to drop back and visit the following day.

Boats turned opposite us everyday, initially we found this rather worrying!

Boats turned opposite us everyday, initially we found this rather worrying!

We stopped off in the Temple Bar area of Dublin and visited the open market, where sat for a while to enjoy some ate oysters and a glass of wine and chat with the locals. We then wondered into Temple Bar where Sean enjoyed a couple of jars of Guinness and I had a couple of cocktails. We also listened to a singer called Dave Browne, who broke the Guinness world record in 2011 for the longest guitar playing marathon of 114 hours. He certainly got us all singing and enjoying the craic!
The Temple bar serves 140 different whiskies – 44 Irish whiskey’s, 76 Scottish whiskies’ and eight international scotch the largest array of whisky I have ever seen. On exiting the pub, we noticed that we had obviously missed a really heavy downpour, great timing.

 

Graffiti or art? As we walked around the South Docks area there are specific areas where graffiti is allowed.

Graffiti or art? As we walked around the South Docks area there are specific areas where graffiti is allowed.

On another day we visited the CHQ Building and saw the world-renown Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition. Selected from 43,000 entrants by amateur and professional photographers worldwide, 100 award winning entrants were beautifully displayed. Each image was accompanied by the photographer’s story of the ‘shot’ and which camera they used. We were given tokens on entry and asked to drop our token into a jar below our personal favourite; it was interesting to see how the general public voted. (www.wpy.ie)

Sean enjoying the oysters in the Temple Bar area of Dublin

Sean enjoying the oysters in the Temple Bar area of Dublin

We also visited a replica of the Jeanie Johnston on Custom House Quay; the ship is an accurate replica and gave us an idea of the challenges faced by emigrants as they fled from poverty and famine. Sometimes our boat can feel over crowded with just four on her, heavens knows what it must have been like sailing thousands of miles across the Atlantic with hundreds of others. The boat made sixteen crossings to Canada, losing not one passenger in all those journeys. The tour was made really enjoyable by the fact the tour guide had swallowed the Blarney stone, you’ll notice I didn’t say kissed. He was absolutely hilarious, creating stories for all the models on board. He ended the tour by asking for a show of hands for those related to the Irish, to which there was a large show of hands. The tour guide pointed out that over the years 1.2 million left in that period, which had grown now to over 7 million additional relatives, so although he was pleased to see us all, could we please not all come home at once.

A drop of the black stuff - or the blonde lady in the black coat!

A drop of the black stuff – or the blonde lady in the black coat!

We have all enjoyed our respective breaks in Dublin but as always we must head on. Sean has done the passage planning and we need to leave at 11.30am, which will mean for the first 9nm the tide will be against us as we leave Dublin heading out of the Liffey; but as we head out into the bay the tides will carry us south. We are two days off springs, so we have quite a lot of tide to aid our passage.

This afternoon we are to Marian and Simon in the supermarket for another  provisioning session, today we have just caught up on ‘jobs’ about the boat.

 

 

So its Thursday morning and we are off, I have prepared us lunch, which is a very healthy option today.

Tomato, basil and mozzarella cheese, with brown bread and butter. Cling filmed all ready to go!

Tomato, basil and mozzarella cheese, with brown bread and butter. Cling filmed all ready to go!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honestly we weren't that close !

Honestly we weren’t that close ! I don’t think Simon deserved the five hoot salute!

Lines were slipped at 11.30 and away we went, Simon was first on the helm and has the dubious honour of being the first person on this trip and in fact on Kantara whilst we have owned her to get five blasts from a passenger ferry coming into Dublin. The the captain was standing in the wheelhouse shaking his arms at Simon, but to be fare we were on the right hand side of our channel leaving port, and there was plenty of room for us to pass, port to port. I think he felt we should have left the channel and given him the whole space.

 

 

 

The rest of the trip passed without due concern, we hit the tide against us as we crossed to laoghaire and then within the hour we had the tide with us for the rest of the journey, meaning that we we started our speed was 4.5knots and as we progressed into the full strength of the tidal stream we were travelling at 9.2 knots. Today we motor sailed all day, some wind but just not enough for a 40 nm journey, at 2.5 knots under sail we wouldn’t have arrived until tomorrow!

We travelled through Muglins Sound, between the two islands, through Killiney Bay, on the outside of Frazer Bank, past Wicklow and into Arklow, carefully avoiding all those nasty sand banks right down this coast.

Arklow

Arklow

 

Kantara on the pontoon at Arklow

Kantara on the pontoon at Arklow

 

They say the first step is always the most difficult, the picture doesn't show this very well, but the height is almost a metre!

They say the first step is always the most difficult, the picture doesn’t show this very well, but the height is almost a metre!

I remembered Arklow from a few previous occasions, so I took the helm and brought her into the harbour, we literally moored up as the heavens opened, I call that ‘the luck of the Irish’.

A little later when we were attaching the electric, I suddenly remembered the water outlet near us, and told everyone we just had to move, because I remember being kept awake by gushing water as the tide goes out, so we moved …and then all went for a pint!

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