Kilmore Quay to Waterford 30nm Sailing around Britain 2014

Date posted: 19 August 2014

As we sail around Britain and Ireland we have encountered various magnetic anomalies which are caused by a local variation in the Earth’s magnetic field resulting from variations in the chemistry or magnetism of the rocks. We have encountered these magnetic anomalies all around the coast

The monument at Forlorn Point

The monument at Forlorn Point

they tend to mean that true readings should be adhered to rather than the magnetic, which can vary by far more than a few degrees in these areas, and where there are a lot of rocks this can be an issue.

We wondered about the village in Kilmore Quay, and visited the memorial garden by Forlorn Point, the gardens are incorporated into a stone ship remembering all those lost at sea over the last couple of hundred years. Names, places, ages, ships and final burial grounds have been noted throughout the years, I was quite shocked by the number of souls lost at sea. One particular story caught my eye.

The inscription remembered one of the worst sea disasters off the Wexford coast with the loss of 387 lives. The immigrant ship ‘Pomona’ bound from Liverpool to New York on 27th March 1859 and was  under the command of Captain Charles Merrinew, on that evening she floundered in stormy seas on the Blackwater Bank off the east coast of Wexford. On board were 373 passengers and a crew of 37, out of the total, in perilous conditions, 387 people lost their lives. 316 of the passengers were Irish emigrants heading for a new life in America, of the 23 survivors, 19 were crew members. The ‘Pomona’ is  a vessel of  1,400 tons carried nearly all her passengers in the hold of the ship in cramped conditions, on a voyage that took many weeks. The story goes that while the ship was being wrecked the crew battened down the hatches, giving the passengers no chance of saving themselves, the crew wanted the lifeboats for themselves.

I think there’s more to that story than the inscription tells us.

The marina in Kilmore Quay

The marina in Kilmore Quay

Kilmore Quay feels as though it’s part of an island, quite isolated, small, but friendly, with everyone knowing everyone else and all about them. For example as we walked towards the quay, we saw a small brown dog unaccompanied trotting purposely up the street with a very large bone hung across its jaws. So we called into the butcher to ask him what the story was, well apparently about every third day, the dog appears and sits in front of the butcher’s window staring at the butcher, until he receives his bone and then he trots off back up the village. The butcher is situated opposite the slipway and on really hot days, the dog takes himself for a swim before visiting the butcher. The butcher knew where the dog lives and who he is owned by, the butcher said ‘he’s a really smart dog that one’, we agreed.

We also visited the local church, which had a beautiful stained glass window, and rather bizarrely poetry around all the walls!

Stain glass window in the St Peters Church

Stain glass window in the St Peters Church

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thatched cottages are part of the architecture in the village of Kilmore

Thatched cottages are part of the architecture in the village of Kilmore

 

The thatching business is alive and well in Kilmore Quay

The thatching business is alive and well in Kilmore Quay

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sean and I also so noticed that there were a considerable number of thatched premises in the village, these were observed to be in various states of repair, we thought that the thatcher must be a busy man in these parts.

65 Euro’s for the two nights including mooring berthing and a load of washing and great internet.

After rather a lovely evening with Pat and Olivia on their boat last night we invited them onto ours this evening, so Sean and I were busy cooking a quiche for a while this afternoon. It’s not as easy as just cooking a quiche, because we are in another new location and first you have to source the ingredients! We also found the pub and gave that a try!

This Celtic cross was found in the  beer garden at Kehoes Pub

This Celtic cross was found in the beer garden at Kehoes Pub

 

Pat and Olivia handing over the Irish Courtesy flag

Pat and Olivia handing over the Irish Courtesy flag

P1080818Pat and Olivia Murphy off Aldeberan came over and joined us for dinner this evening, we soon discovered that not only have we sailed some of the same waters, but we have also backpacked around the world in similar places. We had a truly smashing evening laughing and reminiscing; they had given us a card the previous evening whilst we were on board with them, and they asked what we would write on the back on their boat card, well it has to be, that lovely couple who gave us the Irish tricolour, the travellers, with the dog called Coco.

Sean raising the Irish courtesy flag, you can see the Cornish flag below it!

Sean raising the Irish courtesy flag, you can see the Cornish flag below it!

 

 

 

This morning we headed off somewhat quietly at 8am, it was Marians passage plan today,  initially quite straightforward, we came out of Kilmore Quay and made our way almost to the safe water mark. We turned right and headed off towards Hook Head, one long tack across Ballyteige Bay, the wind was south westerly, about a five.

We were reefed in on a close haul, with the wind coming over our starboard bow, the waves were crashing over the bow, it wasn’t a big sea, there were short choppy waves, which were messy.  We cut in close under Hook Head, the almanac suggests you keep a mile and half off the Head, but quite often the overfalls are better the closer you get underneath the head, which was the case today.

We particularly enjoyed the river journey up the estuary to Waterford, the passage is well marked and a pleasure. I was somewhat surprised to see that they still have the Queen and Kings passage by the Little island on the way up to Waterford! This afternoon we walked round the town and decided what we would do tomorrow. 22.50 Euro’s for the mooring, free showers and internet, 2 Euro’s for the washer and two for the dryer.

Flying our Irish flag with pride

Flying our Irish flag with pride

The lighthouse at Hood Head
The lighthouse at Hood Head

 

Marian checking up as we went along

Marian checking up as we went along

 

Sean checking the marks off as we went up the river to Waterford

Sean checking the marks off as we went up the river to Waterford

 

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