Carlingford Lough to Poolbeg Yacht Club, Dublin 51.4nm Sailing around Britain 2014

Date posted: 10 August 2014

When we all get up and the first conversations are about the weather, you know we are all anxious. During breakfast we all looked up weather reports, and then discussed how we felt about another ten hours in rough seas, right on our nose for a sail from Carlingford Lough to Poolbed Yacht Club in Dublin.

In the back of our minds we were all aware that today was probably our last opportunity to escape Carlingford Lough, before being hit by hurricane Bertha, the weather forecasts were indicating that Bertha would take about a week to pass over us. We were all of the same opinion that we would rather be in Dublin than in Carlingford Lough for a week, even if that meant a long bumpy passage!

So Marian and Simon put dinner into the eco thermal cooker, Sean and I stowed everything carefully, and I made up individual food grab bags ready for the journey. Not all of us are great in rough weather, so seasickness pills were administered,  smiles were plastered on faces as we set off about 9am, there was almost a bit of grim determination about today.

Carlingford Lough Marina, take care when entering and leaving to avoid the sandbank

Carlingford Lough Marina, take care when entering and leaving to avoid the sandbank

Simon did the passage planning for today and guided us out of the marina, avoiding the large sandbank on the entrance; we  headed off out of the Lough into the last hour of the flooding tide, following the dredged marked channels. We were protected in the Lough, but as we headed out past the cardinal Hellyhunter the seas hit us, we were smashing into the waves, and the sea was crashing right over us and the spray hood, crazy! A couple of the weather forecasts described the sea state as ‘wavelets’, as Sean said ‘so these are Irish wavelets then’.

During the day we took turn and turnabout on the helm, between shifts we found areas of the boat to prop ourselves into, mine was the middle of the bow cabin, surrounded by cushions. Every time the boat dropped off the top of the wave, I felt suspended for about two seconds and then hit the bed again. We took the most direct route through Lambay Island, then came out past the Ben of Howth. We motored the whole way as the wind was right on our nose, we were followed the whole distance by two other yachts, doing the same.

Water crashing over the bows of Kantara

Water crashing over the bows of Kantara

 

Lots of white water today

Lots of white water today

 

 

 

 

 

 

But thankfully by about three o’clock the sea state changed and started to smooth out and by seven o’clock in the evening as we were heading up into Dublin,  via the marked channel, the sun was shining and we were all a lot more talkative!

Bailey LIghthouse, which we passed entering Dublin

Bailey LIghthouse, which we passed entering Dublin

We plan to stay here until the weather improves but meanwhile we can take a look round Dublin.

looking from Poolbeg Yacht, boat club and marina towards Dublin City

looking from Poolbeg Yacht, boat club and marina towards Dublin City

Once we had eaten we took a stroll along the river Liffey and saw the Samuel Beckett Bridge

Once we had eaten Sean and I took a stroll along the river Liffey and saw the Samuel Beckett Bridge

 

The Jeanie Johnston Famine ship seen at dusk

The Jeanie Johnston Famine ship seen at dusk

So not a bad really Carlingford Lough to Poolbed Marina Dublin is now off the bucket list!

 

 

 

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