Holy Island (Lindisfarne) to Eyemouth Sailing around Britain 2014

Date posted: 3 June 2014

Holy Island (Lindisfarne) to Eyemouth

Day 32 on the water. Last night we anchored just off Holly Island and had a cacophony of seal noises to serenade us throughout the night. As the sun set and the waters calmed completely we could see two colonies of seals, one on Guile Point and the other on Fenham Flats. There were hundreds of seals, there wasn’t a patch of sand to be seen between them, they stretched out covering 100’s of metres and were five or six deep heading up the beach, just amazing.

 

Seals line the beach off Holy Island

Seals line the beach off Holy Island

We have noticed as we head further north that we have light now from 4.30am until about 10.30pm, I was out on deck this morning videoing the seal around the boat, the water was flat calm, the sun was out and there was a slight mist coming off the sea.

At about nine we headed off in the tender onto the Island with Martin, we weren’t sure what to expect and certainly didn’t anticipate to see such a thriving community. The village is picturesque, the quay and beach steeped in history. Right on the beach are about a dozen old pilchard boats, turned over and used as shed’s.

 

Boat shed seen on the foreshore

Boat shed seen on the foreshore

We walked about the island and spotted, puffins, gannets, razorbills, guillemots, meadow pipet, gold finches, ida ducks, mallard, swallows, skylarks and sparrows. We visited the ruins of the priory,  church, castle and gardens created Gertrude Jecklye, where we rested awhile admiring the views of the castle.

 

 Priory ruins to the castle

Priory ruins to the castle

 

 

meadow pipet

meadow pipet

At midday we went back to get on the tender to find that the tide had gone out so far, the tender was perched on a slight sandbank, with the engine on the wrong side. The tender was also about twelve foot lower than us, so the chaps did a bit of hauling to drag the poor tender over the sand bank, back to some steps where we could access her.

A decision was made to head off to Eyemouth, we cast Martin adrift from us and started to pull up the chain, only to discover we had snagged ‘something’, thankfully the winch is electric, and with a bit of wriggling from different angles Sean freed the anchor. (To be fair in the almanac it did say to place a trip line on your anchor).

So we carefully manoeuvred our way over the sandbar at the entrance to Holy Island, it was  moving to low tide, which meant leaving when we did, we still had two hours of tide with us heading north. We officially left England, and entered Scotland, the passage was uneventful as per usual no wind!

Entry into Eyemouth was interesting, there are leading lights to guide us in, the entrance to the harbour is extremely narrow, there is an inner and outer harbour. We headed into the inner harbour and placed ourselves on a pontoon and awaited Tui’s arrival to help him moor up. Tonight is our last evening together, Martin is cooking a stir fry and we are taking a Eton mess, tomorrow we part company, because Martin needs to head off at a greater pace, we need to hang back so that we can meet friends in Petershead on the 12th.

 

Eyemouth Harbour

Entering Eyemouth Harbour

 

 

A narrow unforgiving channel into Eyemouth harbour

A narrow unforgiving channel into Eyemouth harbour

We took a walk around Eyemouth and collected some provisions, it is obvious where a European grant in 1999 was spent, it’s a pretty bay with a lovely beach.

We aren’t sure yet where we will head to tomorrow, so it will be as much a mystery to you as to us!

 

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